What’s Next?

I did an interview wth HuffPo Gay Voices. Of course some might call this an admission of defeat—because I repeat my belief that it is clear they now have 5 votes for gay marriage on the Supreme Court.

But really it is about taking up the next battle. If true, what next for those of us who do not believe in gay marriage?

A taste here:
‘ What’s next? In my view people who believe in the traditional understanding of marriage, and believe that it matters, have to become a creative minority, finding way to both express these sexual views, culturally, artistically and intellectually and to engage with the newly dominant cultural view of marriage respectfully but not submissively.

Lots of thoughts packed into the latter sentence.

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Suicide By Consultant

The debate launched by our report “Building a Winning Coalition: Lesson from 2012” continues. Ramesh Ponnuru takes us to task for even imagining inflation is an issue, or that monetary reform could be a voting issue.

I am writing to you from the Tyson’s Corner Ritz Carlton.  Frank Cannon is on the panel making the case the social issues are an important part of a winning GOP coalition.
I spent the morning listening to folks say things like “we should be pro-life, but talk about it better, or preferably less.”

The belief that social issues are hurting us politically remains a fixed faith, hard to shake among the consulting and donor class, but is it grounded in hard political fact?  Or are we committing suicide by consultant?

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JS: Walker Shouldn’t Dismiss Social Issues

This article appeared in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on Monday:

Gov. Scott Walker shouldn’t dismiss social issues

By Francis Cannon And Maggie Gallagher

Dec. 9, 2013

The Democrats’ unfolding Obamacare disaster is in danger of temporarily distracting Republicans from their most important task. The Grand Old Party is in the middle of one of those periodic intellectual funks that will lead in the end either to renewal or to defeat.

The Democrats’ hubris in passing a fundamental health care transformation without a single Republican vote combined with President Barack Obama’s lethal combination of deliberate deception and utter incompetence in the Obamacare rollout has breathed new life into the GOP for the 2014 elections.

But the conservative movement, as a movement, cannot depend on reaction to overreach by Democrats as an ongoing governing strategy, and the smart political leaders are recognizing that fact.

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APIA Releases Autopsy Report

In October 2013, American Principles in Action (APIA) released an analysis of the 2012 election titled, “Building a Winning GOP Coalition: The Lessons of 2012″. This analysis stands in sharp contrast to the Republican National Committee’s report, “Growth and Opportunity Project”, popularly known as the “autopsy.”

“Building a Winning GOP Coalition: The Lessons of 2012″, takes a hard-headed, skeptical, and primarily political look at the lessons Republicans must learn from 2012 in order to build a winning national GOP coalition. It challenges the conventional wisdom that the national GOP’s loss in 2012 was a result of a focus on extremist social issues, which hampered candidates touting a winning economic message.

This document challenges the existing “truce model” and puts forward a case for integrated conservatism. It argues social issues are winning issues, and that a winning economic message must address the concerns of middle-class voters.

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Maggie Talks With NRO on GOP “Truce” Strategy

From the National Review Online:

Truce, Be Not Proud

By Kathryn Jean Lopez

As we approach the 2013 elections on Tuesday, the American Principles Project has put together a report on the lessons of the 2012 election, which serves, in part, as a critique of the Republican National Committee’s own autopsy report on Mitt Romney’s loss. Maggie Gallagher, senior fellow at APP, talks with National Review Online about elections past and present and this autopsy of the autopsy.

WaPo: Cuccinelli pays the price for the GOP’s ‘truce strategy’ on abortion

The one lesson Republicans probably will not learn from Ken Cuccinelli’s troubled campaign for Virginia governor is the most important: Politically, the “truce strategy” on abortion fails. If it is not abandoned, it will drag down the GOP.
Democratic charges of a Republican “war on women” are predicated on the GOP’s self-imposed truce on social issues: Republican candidates pledge not to run ads on topics such as abortion. When social subjects arise, GOP candidates go mute, retreat and change the subject. . . .

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Does Faith = Hate?

Rod Dreher had a thoughtful article at The American Conservative that quotes Maggie.  An excerpt:

This summer’s Windsor decision from the Supreme Court overturned the Defense of Marriage Act, but it did not declare a constitutional right to gay marriage. Yet even Maggie Gallagher, the country’s most tireless and high-profile opponent of same-sex marriage, now believes such an outcome is a foregone conclusion.

“It’s clear that the courts are going to shut down the marriage debate and impose gay marriage uniformly,” she says. “There is not yet a unified sense of where we go from here, except for this: there is an accelerating awareness that the consequence of marriage equality is going to be extremely negative for traditionalist Christians.”

…To gay marriage supporters, homosexuality is, like race, a morally neutral condition. Opponents disagree, believing that because homosexuality, like heterosexuality, has to do with behavior, it cannot be separated from moral reflection. As Gallagher put it in a 2010 paper in Northwestern University’s law journal, “Skin color does not give rise to a morality.”Read More…