What’s Next?

I did an interview wth HuffPo Gay Voices. Of course some might call this an admission of defeat—because I repeat my belief that it is clear they now have 5 votes for gay marriage on the Supreme Court.

But really it is about taking up the next battle. If true, what next for those of us who do not believe in gay marriage?

A taste here:
‘ What’s next? In my view people who believe in the traditional understanding of marriage, and believe that it matters, have to become a creative minority, finding way to both express these sexual views, culturally, artistically and intellectually and to engage with the newly dominant cultural view of marriage respectfully but not submissively.

Lots of thoughts packed into the latter sentence.

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Suicide By Consultant

The debate launched by our report “Building a Winning Coalition: Lesson from 2012” continues. Ramesh Ponnuru takes us to task for even imagining inflation is an issue, or that monetary reform could be a voting issue.

I am writing to you from the Tyson’s Corner Ritz Carlton.  Frank Cannon is on the panel making the case the social issues are an important part of a winning GOP coalition.
I spent the morning listening to folks say things like “we should be pro-life, but talk about it better, or preferably less.”

The belief that social issues are hurting us politically remains a fixed faith, hard to shake among the consulting and donor class, but is it grounded in hard political fact?  Or are we committing suicide by consultant?

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Reaction to Prop 8 Ruling

The Supreme Court has just abandoned 7 million voters, giving us no justice and no access to the courts..  The California Supreme Court made it clear that the proponents of Prop 8 are delegated the right to defend the law if state official refuse to do so.  But after accepting standing in DOMA because. . .well because it wanted to, the majority of the Supreme Court justices simply punted unable to recognize a clear injustice in kicking out of court people who have devoted thousands of hours to the democratic process –and $3 million to the defense of the law–that the Court today treats as beggars with no interest in the outcome. Read More…

Motherless Children

While we wait for the Supreme Court to rule, the New York Times publishes an amazingly sensitive column by a gay father on what his well-loved child misses:

“SOMETIMES when my daughter, who is 7, is nicely cuddled up in her bed and I snuggle her, she calls me Mommy. I am a stay-at-home dad. My male partner and I adopted both of our children at birth in open domestic adoptions. We could fill our home with nannies, sisters, grandmothers, female friends, but no mothers.

My daughter says “Mommy” in a funny way, in a high-pitched voice. Although I refer the honors immediately to her birth mom, I am flattered. But saddened as well, because she expresses herself in a voice that is not her own. It is her stuffed-animal voice. She expresses not only love; she also expresses alienation. She can role-play the mother-daughter relationship, but she cannot use her real voice, nor have the real thing.

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This Generation’s Roe v. Wade

Dear friend,

Next week, the Supreme Court will probably rule on two marriage cases. They will decide whether 7 million Californians who passed Prop 8 have the Constitutional right to vote to define marriage as one man and one woman, and whether Congress can so define marriage for the limited purpose of federal law.

Pundits are predicting a messy, hard-to-interpret decision, possibly refusing to issue any ruling on the substance on the grounds neither the House nor Prop 8 proponents have standing.

Pundits have also worked overtime the last few months to reassure the Court that it can rule for gay marriage without fear of creating another Roe v. Wade.

On June 10, for example, the Christian Science Monitor published an op ed by James Richardson, a self-described “conservative communication strategist” who worked for the RNC and Jon Huntsman, “Why Supreme Court’s Gay Marriage Ruling Won’t Be like Roe v. Wade.”

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Breakthrough News: How Two Moms Took Down the Common Core

Dear Friend,

Meet Heather Crossin and Erin Tuttle.

You can see them just below with APP’s Emmett McGroarty (whom Heather calls “The General” of the movement to repeal the Common Core) at a historic bill-signing ceremony with Indiana Governor Mike Pence making Indiana the first state to “pause” the Common Core State Standards.

mcgroarty-crossin-pence-tuttle

I know Emmett well and I’ve admired his thoughtfulness, his grit, and his determination to rollback what was essentially a secret plan between D.C. trade groups, the Gates Foundation, and the Obama administration to foist a set of untested standards on virtually every state in America.

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The Line Between Good and Evil

Dear friend,

Here is the question that lies so heavy on so many hearts:

What “radicalized” the brothers Tsarnaev?

How could these two young refugees, whom Americans welcomed with open arms, turn so viciously against us all?  What is it that turns young men into monsters?

Why?

The elder brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, seemed to fit our stereotypes of the Jihadist among us: friendless, failing, restless, a sudden turn to religious fervor, overseas travel. In the first few days, it was hard for the media to find any American who claimed to know and like Tamerlan.

What about Dzhokhar, the younger brother?  This 19 year old came over as a young child, grew up among us, an athlete, a good student, winner of a scholarship from Cambridge, one whose life abounded with American friends, all of whom testify he was a great guy, a normal kid, an American son.

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What Other Issue Has Experienced Such a Rapid Polling Shift as Marriage?

Over at Family Scholars, David Blankenhorn posted a graph of the shift in public opinion on gay marriage (in response to the question “legal or illegal?),  and suggests, “I can’t recall any issue on which U.S. opinion has changed this quickly“.
Here’s another recent example, from 1996 to 1998 “With respect to abortion do you consider yourself pro-life or prochoice?”

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Maggie: Will We Bridge the Gender Divide?

Back in the year 2000, in the old new marriage conversation, we said in The Marriage Movement: A Statement of Principles (a statement I helped to draft):

“Marriage is a universal human institution, the way in which every known society conspires to obtain for each child the love, attention and resources of a mother and father.”

This year, the Institute for American Values released a call for a new marriage conversation, which says instead:  “because marriage is the main institution governing the link between the spousal association and the parent-child association, marriage is society’s most pro-child institution.”

That is the difference gay marriage makes in how we converse about marriage.

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Will President Obama Draft Julia?

Is President Obama willing to draft Julia?

The Obama administration framed its decision to put women into combat as a matter of choice and fairness.

“Not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier,” outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said, “but everyone is entitled to a chance.”

But there is little about war that is either about choice or fairness.

Here’s a big question President Obama ought to be made to face head on: Is he willing to draft Julia on an equal basis with John and if not, why not?

Because President Obama has just gutted the legal rationale for excluding women from registering for the draft.

Why aren’t women required to register for the draft?  Because they are excluded from combat, the Selective Service System succinctly reports:

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